Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering  (Read 2507 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Lavaspit

  • S1000R Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Bike: S1000R
  • City / Town: San Francisco
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2018, 07:19:13 PM »
Thoughtful answers.

I believe I am riding near the limit - maybe not for this bike, but certainly for in-city speeds.  Here in SF I am always pushing hard.  I can see both sides of this and both perspectives speak to my question of mechanics vs mentality perfectly.  In the end I will take both points.

On my SC1000 a pro suspension setup was immedialey noticable and confidence inspiring (never should have sold that damn bike).  I also think that while riding technique is more important than that setup at a certain spectrum of ability, on this particular bike which I find pretty sensitive, aka twitchy, suspension is a bigger variable than elsewhere.

That being said a refresher on cornering is important, for everyone, every season.  Id really like to go to Cal super bike this spring.  They use SC1KRRs on the track.  Well see.  Meanwhile what I can do is ride out to catalyst reaction and get a suspension adjustment for the body weight I want to be, which is 10-20lbs less.  That should help me get through the rain season more comfortably. 

As an aside to this thread Id say that the stock levers dont help this situation, and every bike Ive ridden Ive replaced the levers immediately after the exhaust.  This bike really needs fine articulation and it would be nice to take that pressure off my hands, and get my inputs lower in general.  I think a light touch creates trait in the bike, lets it ride itself more, and sets youre thinking up to allow the bike to glide you through corners more naturally.  Its really 99% the bike, 1% me and there are a lot of little reasons I find myself pushing against that balance.

I think you guys have really helped me find some understanding here, and while its nothing new it comes up every few years.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2018, 07:22:32 PM by Lavaspit »

Offline greentree428

  • S1000R Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Jake
  • Bike: 16' S1000R
  • City / Town: Kent
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #21 on: January 20, 2018, 09:14:53 AM »
*Originally Posted by sweatmark [+]
.... It would be cool if BMW provided demo ride experience on bikes equipped with stability/traction control, similar to the old ABS demo bikes with outriggers; experiencing active control systems under managed risk environment would help riders recognize when those systems function....
:0461:
 
Very well said.

Offline beech

  • S1000R Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 387
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • I change tires, you buy them on the web. $40
  • Bike: S1000R, K1300S
  • City / Town: Mount Vernon, WA
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2018, 10:39:11 PM »
An interesting thread. Riding at 8 in the city clearly has some disadvantages. My only comment is the best thing I have done for my riding is to attend Keith Code California Superbike School. Needless to say one can learn a whole lot there. I wish I had done it years ago.

Offline CraigA

  • S1000R Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Bike: S1000R
  • City / Town: Sunshine Coast
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #23 on: February 05, 2018, 03:04:26 AM »
*Originally Posted by beech [+]
An interesting thread. Riding at 8 in the city clearly has some disadvantages. My only comment is the best thing I have done for my riding is to attend Keith Code California Superbike School. Needless to say one can learn a whole lot there. I wish I had done it years ago.

I have only done level 1 but wholeheartedly agree.

Even watching "Twist of the Wrist 2" is a nice way to just analyse what you do as opposed to what you should be doing.

 I sit through the corny bits every 18 months or so and still manage to pick little things up correct some bad habits every time I watch it.

Offline mart242

  • S1000R Member
  • **
  • Posts: 54
  • Country: ca
  • Gender: Male
  • Bike: '17 S1000R
  • City / Town: Ottawa, Canada
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2018, 06:58:25 PM »
*Originally Posted by CraigA [+]
Even watching "Twist of the Wrist 2" is a nice way to just analyse what you do as opposed to what you should be doing.



dammit, animated gif doesn't seem to work.  see here  http://i.imgur.com/Z8d4BRg.gif

Offline ren

  • S1000R Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 117
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Bike: 2014 S1R
  • City / Town: San Francisco
Re: Mechanics vs. Psychology of Cornering
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2018, 06:24:12 AM »
I have been wanting to reply to this for a while but didn’t want to come off like a dick.
As a dude who rides his s1kr into San Francisco on almost a daily basis your post about pushing the bike in the city to any kind of limits feels off. I mean sf is a minefield of peds and buses and awful pavement I can’t really grasp what you mean by that.

But I will say I think city riding for long enough would make anyone cagey and I dont know how you would even judge “cornering” confidence in such a fragile and fraught situation.

I invite you to come out to the country and ride the coast with me in the north bay and I’m sure you will quickly regain confidence.

Cheers

 


Recent Posts/Topics

sociology-monitor