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Offline starpower

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2016, 12:26:36 AM »
Excellent write up! Mine were leaking all they could before dripping on the ground and I cleaned them off after each ride. I did some research on replacing seals and read that over 90% of leaks are caused by debris caught up in the seal. I bought one of those thin plastic seal cleaners and instantly saw that it is super easy to make from YouTube vids. Anyway used the thing circling the seals a few times as directed with lots of fork pumping. The leak got less with each ride as they seated. Now I have zero weep and bone dry. Well worth a try can only loose 5 minutes.
"The most beautiful things in the world are those from which all excess weight has been eliminated" - Henry Ford I, 1893

Offline Lowrance

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2016, 03:08:02 PM »
*Originally Posted by starpower [+]
Excellent write up! Mine were leaking all they could before dripping on the ground and I cleaned them off after each ride. I did some research on replacing seals and read that over 90% of leaks are caused by debris caught up in the seal. I bought one of those thin plastic seal cleaners and instantly saw that it is super easy to make from YouTube vids. Anyway used the thing circling the seals a few times as directed with lots of fork pumping. The leak got less with each ride as they seated. Now I have zero weep and bone dry. Well worth a try can only loose 5 minutes.

Possible they stopped leaking because there is no more oil in them?   :002:

The forks on this bike hold very little oil.  Can't remember the exact volume but it's under a half litre per leg.
Why is common sense so uncommon?

Offline starpower

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2016, 03:30:18 PM »
I don't think they stopped leaking due to being dry. As mentioned they never dripped. Could not have lost more than a couple cc's.
"The most beautiful things in the world are those from which all excess weight has been eliminated" - Henry Ford I, 1893

Offline Rob H

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2016, 04:42:26 AM »
Great write up, thanks for taking the time.

Offline Wsl346

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2016, 08:14:05 PM »
Alright. After my sitting in my garage for over a month, I've finally mustered the energy the finish my fork seal replacement.  :082:

Step 19: Although i've replaced fork seals plenty of times, in my haste I forgot an important step. You'll need to loosen up the fork cap in the clamps. Maybe you have hands of steal, but the cap is on very tight and you're going to need to have the clamps hold the fork for you. Since BMW has decided to design the fork cap so that you can't use a standard socket, you'll need to use a crescent wrench or a 32mm open ended wrench. Go ahead a loosen it all the way and then screw the cap back in a few turns so that oil does not spill out when you remove the fork from the clamps.



Step 20: The damper rod will have a nut that you need to keep from spinning while you remove the cap from the rod assembly. Pull down the outer tube from the cap and insert a 19mm wrench in between the spring. It is probably recommended that you use a spring compressor to access the damper nut, but I didn't see the need, nor did I want to spend $125 USD on one. unscrew the cap while holding the 19mm wrench to free the cap from the damper.



Step 21: Unscrew the threaded washer from the damper rod. I was able to do this by hand. It was not very tight. Next remove the washer that sits on top of the spring, remove the spring, and lastly, there will be one more washer under the spring and a plastic sleeve that slides over the stanchion, but you won't be able to retrieve there till you drain the oil. Lay everything out on a clean surface in the order it came out of the fork.



Step 22: Drain out the oil. Surprisingly, there wasn't much in there, maybe 200ml at most. I guess that's because the dampening rod is sealed due to the electronics inside. The oil will drain out quite slowly, so if you can, stand the fork upside down and go do something else for 10 minutes.



Step 23: Once the oil is drained, remove the two pinch bolts so that you can access the damper bolt on the bottom of the fork. The damper bolt was really tight and is recessed quite far in the bottom part of the fork. I was unable to get enough force with an 8mm allen wrench so I had to run out to the auto parts store to buy an extended allen key socket so that I could use a socket wrench to get enough torque to break the bolt free. You may want to unscrew the bolt over something to drain oil into, as residual oil may come out. Once the bolt is removed, you can slide the damper out of the fork.





Step 24: Now that there are no more components in the fork, pull the stanchion from the outer tube. You will need to undo the ring clip holding the fork seal in before you do this. weirdly enough, when I pulled the stanchion from the tube, the fork seal did not pop out with it, which is something I've never experienced before when replacing my dirt bike's fork seals. I had to use a large tire iron to free the seal from the outer tube.




Step 25: Under the fork seal will be a washer and a busing which are easily removed. Lay all the seal components on a clean surface in the order they were removed.



Step 26. At this time, your fork should be completely disassembled. This would be a good time to carefully check over each component to insure there is no damage. Pay extra attention to the stanchion to ensure there are no nicks or damage to the chrome. If there is, you will need to address it before re-assembling the fork.



Here is the seal kit I purchased. It is from SKF and was about $30USD. It came with a new seal and a new dust seal. The part number is KIT46Z.



Step 27: Now it's time to re-assemble. For this step you will need three items. I seal bullet (plastic cylinder that slides over the top of the stanchion to protect the seal from tearing on the sharp edges), painters tape (There is a drain hole in the stanchion that will need to be covered to once again protect the seal), and a seal driver. Place the seal bullet on top of the stanchion and cover the hole with painters tape. Slide the follow components onto the stanchion in this order and make sure they are oriented just as you took them out: Dust seal, ring clip, oil seal, washer, bushing. Also give all the components a light coating of fork oil for protection as you slide them onto the stanchion.






Step 28:  Remove the bullet and painters tape, then slide the outer fork back over the stanchion just past the hole in the stanchion.

Step 29: Turn the fork assemble upside down and let the bushing and washer fall into position. Attached the seal driver and lightly tap the washer and bushing into place. It will not take much force and you will feel when they are properly seated.



Step 30: Slide the oil seal into the outer tube and attach the seal driver again. With medium force, drive the seal into the outer tube until you feel the seal fully seat. I know thats not very descriptive but you will be able to tell by feel when the seal is properly seated. You can now re-install the clamp ring into the groves. If the ring doesn't easily pop back in, the seal is not properly seated.




Step 31: Slide the dust seal into the end of the outer fork. It is tough to get it seated with your hands, so I used a tire iron and a mallet to get it back in. Be careful not to scratch the chrome on the stanchion.

Step 32: Turn the fork back over and slide the damper back in. You will notice that the bottom on the damper is notched so ensure that the damper is oriented so that the notch seats into the corresponding recess in the bottom on the fork. This will hold the damper in place while you screw the bolt back in.



Step 33: Re-install the damper screw and tighten to 30nm.

Step 34: Fill the fork back up with oil. I am not sure how much it needs, but you want there to be 90mm of space between the oil and the top of the fork. How you measure that is up to you, but I bought a special fork oil measuring tool. Let the fork sit for about 10 minutes before measuring so that the oil can drain all the way to the bottom of the fork.

Step 35: Once your oil level is correct, slide the bottom washer, the plastic sleeve, the spring, and the top washer over the damper rod.

Step 36: Place the 19mm wrench back through the spring, holding onto the damper rod nut, and screw the cap back in with your wrench. Not sure what the proper torque spec is but I did it by feel.

Step 37: Tighten the cap back into place as best as you can. You can fully tighten it again once the fork is back in the clamps.

Step 38: Re-install every trim component in reverse order, and grab a beer once done.

That's it! My bike is now back together and I'll finally get to ride her this morning!




Let me know if you have any questions before attempting this repair. I'm happy to help clarify or give additional details.

Offline Shasta McNasty

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #15 on: July 04, 2016, 09:56:48 PM »
Thanks for the great illustrated write-up.   :062:

But, did your dealer refuse to do replace your leaking fork seal under warranty? 

Offline Wsl346

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2016, 09:59:44 PM »
*Originally Posted by Shasta McNasty [+]
Thanks for the great illustrated write-up.   :062:

But, did your dealer refuse to do replace your leaking fork seal under warranty?

At first they said it wasn't covered. I then called up another dealership 200 miles away and they said it was covered. I took this information back to my local dealership and they said they would have to do some "research". They dragged their feet for a month and I got tired of waiting.

Offline Shasta McNasty

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2016, 01:39:11 AM »
Thanks for the reply. I just can't see how it wouldn't be covered!   :187:  I would be pissed if my dealer took a month to "do research"!  230: 

Offline hedonist222

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #18 on: April 29, 2017, 05:26:37 PM »
Thank you very much for sharing this.
2016 bmw r ninet
2016 bmw s1000r

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Offline Supermarine

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Re: Blown Fork Seal Repair - [How To]
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2017, 05:38:48 AM »
The seals dont hold up very well, I've done 2 replacements at 10,000k intervals.I noticed the wiper seal rubber had gone slightly brittle and showing cracks on the lip, while the inner seal was less elastic than it should be.Maybe its just the oem (skf) seals.After market might be a better choice.

 


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