Author Topic: 2022 S1000R dyno  (Read 1391 times)

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#10

Offline jaykay2000

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #10 on: July 19, 2021, 05:37:52 PM
Not knowing much about this stuff......it seems to logically make sense with some of the claimed 0-60 times and BMW historically tending to be a bit more conservative with their numbers.

I mean i think to 100/120 it as fast of marginally slower than the streetfighter.

Would like to see some more tests to get a better sample but got to applaud BMW here. Light and packs a punch!

Mine has definitely loosened up and a bit more of an animal after the 1st service. She like to go round on 50% of her contact patch  :005: :112:

#11

Offline podders

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #11 on: July 19, 2021, 07:13:02 PM
*Originally Posted by ZaiCo [+]
. But the S1000R compares pretty well against the Super Duke if nothing else.

TimestampBikeCrankWheel
1:14S 1000 R 169,6155,8
2:16Speed Triple 1200 RS162148,7
3:09Streetfighter V4S200,7184,4
4:18Super Duke 1290 R173158,7


You need to take a SuperDuke out for a test ride if you think the BMW compares to it, maybe at top RPM which bar the bragging rights, most of us dont use, day to day..

At low to mid range the BMW engine feels extremely limp and the KTM romps away from it, the Triumph is somewhere between the two, either way, both these bikes are more interesting and engaging than the new BMW...I say this as someone who has ridden all the bikes (bar the Ducati) .

In isolation , any of them feel great but some are better than others to ride for sure.

#12

Offline Toolman

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #12 on: July 22, 2021, 05:20:59 PM
*Originally Posted by podders [+]
You need to take a SuperDuke out for a test ride if you think the BMW compares to it, maybe at top RPM which bar the bragging rights, most of us dont use, day to day..

At low to mid range the BMW engine feels extremely limp and the KTM romps away from it, the Triumph is somewhere between the two, either way, both these bikes are more interesting and engaging than the new BMW...I say this as someone who has ridden all the bikes (bar the Ducati) .

In isolation , any of them feel great but some are better than others to ride for sure.

I've also ridden the same 3 as yourself, I was concerned about the lack of KTM Dealers and possible poor backup from the factory, I found the new BMW a bit boring so I bought a Speed Triple 1200, so far at 600 miles I love it!

#13

Offline ZaiCo

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #13 on: July 22, 2021, 08:24:54 PM
*Originally Posted by podders [+]
You need to take a SuperDuke out for a test ride if you think the BMW compares to it, maybe at top RPM which bar the bragging rights, most of us dont use, day to day..

At low to mid range the BMW engine feels extremely limp and the KTM romps away from it, the Triumph is somewhere between the two, either way, both these bikes are more interesting and engaging than the new BMW...I say this as someone who has ridden all the bikes (bar the Ducati) .

In isolation , any of them feel great but some are better than others to ride for sure.

Well, I was only comparing the dyno numbers after all. And based on those they do compare pretty well -- especially considering the differences on the spec sheets.

I'm not likely to test a SDR since my local dealership doesn't do demos sadly. I was interested in it but they are borderline impossible to insure (at least for me where I live) last I looked. I remember reading a forum post of someone who had manage to get a quote and the price (for one year) was the same as the cost of the actual bike.. Completely insane. Sort of the same story with the SFV4S so they are both kinda out of the running.

So the S1KR is currently at the top of my list since it seems like a great overall package, but I am a bit afraid that the power will end up being too high up the rev range as you said. The local Motorrad dealer does have demo bikes so I really need to just get it done and test one.. And the 1200 RS too for that matter..

#14

Offline leomaxi

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #14 on: July 23, 2021, 08:32:02 AM
Well I tried the various 3-cylinder Triumphs but honestly I didn't find it as exciting as my old 3-cylinder 1130 TNT Cafe Race Benelli ..... A whole other world

#15

Offline podders

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #15 on: July 23, 2021, 07:40:23 PM
*Originally Posted by ZaiCo [+]
Well, I was only comparing the dyno numbers after all. And based on those they do compare pretty well -- especially considering the differences on the spec sheets.

I'm not likely to test a SDR since my local dealership doesn't do demos sadly. I was interested in it but they are borderline impossible to insure (at least for me where I live) last I looked. I remember reading a forum post of someone who had manage to get a quote and the price (for one year) was the same as the cost of the actual bike.. Completely insane. Sort of the same story with the SFV4S so they are both kinda out of the running.

So the S1KR is currently at the top of my list since it seems like a great overall package, but I am a bit afraid that the power will end up being too high up the rev range as you said. The local Motorrad dealer does have demo bikes so I really need to just get it done and test one.. And the 1200 RS too for that matter..

I think your points are very valid, many people opt for the BMW as the network is good and they have a relationship with the dealer which is enhanced by  , generally, a high level of customer service .  I really wanted to buy the new R (and posted as such about it last year) and the dealer network was a big part in that wish.

Putting that aside, I dont think many of those that can or have the ability to actually test ride the bikes to make an informed comparison between all the Supernakeds would choose the new R as a preference. 

That also would have been the easiest thing for me to have done , when I bought my S1000R new in 2018 , it would be fair to say, it wasnt a popular choice, the MT10 generally considered by press and internet "experts" to be the better choice and I very nearly bought one but a test ride on the BMW quickly proved it was the better bike in every respect bar legroom and engine noise.

 I have no brand loyalty, im lucky enough to have a Ducati, several Yams, a Honda and a Kawasaki so ill go for what I enjoy the most...Its interesting that every manufacturers forum or FB page im on, everyone considers their bike to be "the best" in its respective class, with Ducati owners being the worst for a blinkered view!

In 2018 I rode the 1050 Speed Triple and didnt find it favourable at all but the new bike is, I found anyway, much better built with a higher spec than the BMW and it is undoubtable far more engaging to ride, as is the KTM.  In 2024, who knows, I may be back on a BMW!

The old model was an absolute belter and a bargain, I took the last journey on mine today and will be very sad to see it go, a few waterpumps and loom aside, its been mega to own and ride.

 






#16

Online windyrun

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #16 on: July 23, 2021, 09:11:21 PM
On the fun scale I still rate the Tuono the best !!! I'll get my coat and leave now ... ;)


#17

Offline nrthrnbkr

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #17 on: July 23, 2021, 11:36:26 PM







I thought this would be worth sharing - took a test ride and put some thoughts on the FB forum - hope you find them useful :

I currently ride a second generation 2020 BMW S1000R Sport. Iíve been riding S1Rs for the past 5 years and am obviously tempted by the Mark 3 version which was launched this year.

The offer of a test ride allowed me to stretch the legs of the new bike and undertake some direct back to back comparisons.

The new bike is based on the latest version of the RR, which equates to frame, similar running gear and the engine, which has been retuned to deliver around 165bhp but without the shiftcam technology of its faster sibling.

Gone is the twin headlight bikini fairing, making the BMW a true naked bike with just a headlight and flat bars up front. Visually the bike is stunning and well finished, the electronics are improved with the aid of a 6 axis IMU (previously 5 axis) and everything is general tighter and even more purposeful than before.

The new bike is definitely an evolution. On a first ride there are some very familiar aspects such as the general feel and riding position. The seat is a smidge taller and overall the bike feels taut, tighter and slightly more focussed. But this bike only had 500 miles on so it may loosen up.

Power feels the similar to the generation two model, but again it seems quite tight - thereís no exhaust popping on the overrun and even Dynamic Pro struggles to produce a gargle unless really pushed. It is one aspect of the Gen 1&2s Iíd definitely miss !

The TFT and screen options are fantastic and really easy to use, easy to use, top quality and bang on point in terms of modern clocks.

A big concern, reported on other forums, is the lack of a tail light. The rear indicators now serve as a rear tail light, brake lights and latterly as combined indicators. When braking however, the flashing indicator is hard to spot and could leave the rider vulnerable to following traffic during daylight. Whilst this seems like a neat solution, a set up like that found on some Yamahas  where indicators serve as daytime riding lights, but switch to full indicator mode when needed, would be much better. Itís hard to fathom why disposing of a dedicated tail light was deemed a good idea.

This was the Ďkeylessí model - however the tank cap is keyed - so when filling up you have to take off your gloves and root around in your pockets to dig out your key - I honestly wouldnít be too bothered re: keyless vs. keys.

Aesthetically, I think the bike looks great and I think I was about 80% comfy after a few miles compared to the Gen 2. I think touring comfort on one of these will be interesting though and is yet to be fully tested by new owners.

The wind blast, especially at motorway speed, wasnít as bad as I thought - I think your arms and side of the upper chest are more exposed, compared to an earlier version of the S1000R with a decent screen on.

I do think not putting a small fairing on loses a more practical and definite design angle to the bike.  Other Ďnakedsí such as the new Aprilia Tuono come with 3/4 fixed fairings and benefit very much from it.

Overall the handling was spot on (I think this had Dunlopís on) and totally sure footed with no complaints and the brakes were very sharp and effective  in road use (although maybe a bit blunt in all honesty with a very firm first bite).

I didnít have the opportunity to look too closely at the calipers which were branded BMW (Hayes manufactured I assume). The old Brembos are great to work on - literally 2 bolts and 2 simple clips per caliper - the new calipers seemed to have retaining plates instead of clips ; so I hope they are equally as easy to take apart for the home mechanic?

The cruise/shifter micro-switch tabs on the clutch (which were pretty fragile)  seem to have gone and a much cleaner unit is integrated into the lever unit. Both levers are black and adjustable so Iíd be tempted to leave them be.

In general use I thought the throttle was twitchy ; if the throttle has a self learning element it could be down to multiple users and adaptations can be reset by a dealer. The various modes offer subtle changes to power delivery and ride. Rain softens everything up and cuts power to around 130bhp, with sharper responses, sharper suspension, more aggressive throttle play and fewer rider aids as you move through Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro.

Vibrations are still present and not that pleasant at 4.5k / 70mph - itís like theyíve tried to address the issue but itís still there. I suppose with the sports-bike rigidity in its DNA and the overall nature of BMW IL4s, the industrial buzz of the motor is here to stay.

The gearbox seems very solid and more accurate but I didnít think the up/down shift was as slick as the outgoing model - again itís a new bike - downshifts were a bit clunky - I didnít really try anything at very high revs, but between 4-7k this Gen3 wasnít as fluid as the Gen2 on the shifter.

One thing I did notice, is that every time I turned it on it idled at 2k for a short while until you moved off - it canít be to warm it up but I wonder if itís an engine protection and oil circulation thing ?

The bike also tripped into its first service warning - using the TFT this is a massive message on your display telling you to cough up at the dealers - these infinitely pants tactics continue from BM on the service blackmail front as a full diagnostic reset is required to get rid of the message.

I think youíre getting a very modern on point bike - it looks good and has all the toys - itís a much more rounded package than the previous Gens (power wise youíre probably getting more of an XR in a R format rather than a RR with the fairing ripped off - but itís good).

Getting back on mine though and right after the dealer service, I  started it up at 6k miles to the sound of something akin to swinging a chain in a metal drain pipe (this is a normal, dealer accepted issue as the hydraulic cam chain tensioner jerks into action). But the bike feels nice a loose, the Gen 2 riding position is slightly kinder and the motor does feel slightly more urgent (comparing road mode on both models).

The new generation S1000R is a striking bike, both fast and agile and more than capable of serving most riders within its capable limits. Itís the perfect antidote to sports bikes without really losing any edge in road performance and focus - as a rider on my search for my next bike, this is an obvious contender.



#18

Offline Monsoon

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #18 on: July 25, 2021, 03:05:01 AM
Funny reading the different opinions on this bike. I find this bike a lot of fun. The quick shift I find is the smoothest I've had. I did the brentune to it and it's even better. The tune did a nice job on the lower end of things. I feel it pull harder down low. Like I said in another topic, a friend with his new Duke 1290 and I did a 1st gear, 50 km/hr roll on. His Duke couldn't keep up. He may have jumped a few feet ahead at first but then I pulled away. That was probably is launching at different times. The carbon wheels make a difference. Its my first carbon wheels. This feels like a 600 to me.  I love my 21 Ducati but it's a tough toss up between the two for different reasons.

#19

Offline Hamburg

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Re: 2022 S1000R dyno
Reply #19 on: July 25, 2021, 08:29:28 AM
*Originally Posted by nrthrnbkr [+]







I thought this would be worth sharing - took a test ride and put some thoughts on the FB forum - hope you find them useful :

I currently ride a second generation 2020 BMW S1000R Sport. Iíve been riding S1Rs for the past 5 years and am obviously tempted by the Mark 3 version which was launched this year.

The offer of a test ride allowed me to stretch the legs of the new bike and undertake some direct back to back comparisons.

The new bike is based on the latest version of the RR, which equates to frame, similar running gear and the engine, which has been retuned to deliver around 165bhp but without the shiftcam technology of its faster sibling.

Gone is the twin headlight bikini fairing, making the BMW a true naked bike with just a headlight and flat bars up front. Visually the bike is stunning and well finished, the electronics are improved with the aid of a 6 axis IMU (previously 5 axis) and everything is general tighter and even more purposeful than before.

The new bike is definitely an evolution. On a first ride there are some very familiar aspects such as the general feel and riding position. The seat is a smidge taller and overall the bike feels taut, tighter and slightly more focussed. But this bike only had 500 miles on so it may loosen up.

Power feels the similar to the generation two model, but again it seems quite tight - thereís no exhaust popping on the overrun and even Dynamic Pro struggles to produce a gargle unless really pushed. It is one aspect of the Gen 1&2s Iíd definitely miss !

The TFT and screen options are fantastic and really easy to use, easy to use, top quality and bang on point in terms of modern clocks.

A big concern, reported on other forums, is the lack of a tail light. The rear indicators now serve as a rear tail light, brake lights and latterly as combined indicators. When braking however, the flashing indicator is hard to spot and could leave the rider vulnerable to following traffic during daylight. Whilst this seems like a neat solution, a set up like that found on some Yamahas  where indicators serve as daytime riding lights, but switch to full indicator mode when needed, would be much better. Itís hard to fathom why disposing of a dedicated tail light was deemed a good idea.

This was the Ďkeylessí model - however the tank cap is keyed - so when filling up you have to take off your gloves and root around in your pockets to dig out your key - I honestly wouldnít be too bothered re: keyless vs. keys.

Aesthetically, I think the bike looks great and I think I was about 80% comfy after a few miles compared to the Gen 2. I think touring comfort on one of these will be interesting though and is yet to be fully tested by new owners.

The wind blast, especially at motorway speed, wasnít as bad as I thought - I think your arms and side of the upper chest are more exposed, compared to an earlier version of the S1000R with a decent screen on.

I do think not putting a small fairing on loses a more practical and definite design angle to the bike.  Other Ďnakedsí such as the new Aprilia Tuono come with 3/4 fixed fairings and benefit very much from it.

Overall the handling was spot on (I think this had Dunlopís on) and totally sure footed with no complaints and the brakes were very sharp and effective  in road use (although maybe a bit blunt in all honesty with a very firm first bite).

I didnít have the opportunity to look too closely at the calipers which were branded BMW (Hayes manufactured I assume). The old Brembos are great to work on - literally 2 bolts and 2 simple clips per caliper - the new calipers seemed to have retaining plates instead of clips ; so I hope they are equally as easy to take apart for the home mechanic?

The cruise/shifter micro-switch tabs on the clutch (which were pretty fragile)  seem to have gone and a much cleaner unit is integrated into the lever unit. Both levers are black and adjustable so Iíd be tempted to leave them be.

In general use I thought the throttle was twitchy ; if the throttle has a self learning element it could be down to multiple users and adaptations can be reset by a dealer. The various modes offer subtle changes to power delivery and ride. Rain softens everything up and cuts power to around 130bhp, with sharper responses, sharper suspension, more aggressive throttle play and fewer rider aids as you move through Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro.

Vibrations are still present and not that pleasant at 4.5k / 70mph - itís like theyíve tried to address the issue but itís still there. I suppose with the sports-bike rigidity in its DNA and the overall nature of BMW IL4s, the industrial buzz of the motor is here to stay.

The gearbox seems very solid and more accurate but I didnít think the up/down shift was as slick as the outgoing model - again itís a new bike - downshifts were a bit clunky - I didnít really try anything at very high revs, but between 4-7k this Gen3 wasnít as fluid as the Gen2 on the shifter.

One thing I did notice, is that every time I turned it on it idled at 2k for a short while until you moved off - it canít be to warm it up but I wonder if itís an engine protection and oil circulation thing ?

The bike also tripped into its first service warning - using the TFT this is a massive message on your display telling you to cough up at the dealers - these infinitely pants tactics continue from BM on the service blackmail front as a full diagnostic reset is required to get rid of the message.

I think youíre getting a very modern on point bike - it looks good and has all the toys - itís a much more rounded package than the previous Gens (power wise youíre probably getting more of an XR in a R format rather than a RR with the fairing ripped off - but itís good).

Getting back on mine though and right after the dealer service, I  started it up at 6k miles to the sound of something akin to swinging a chain in a metal drain pipe (this is a normal, dealer accepted issue as the hydraulic cam chain tensioner jerks into action). But the bike feels nice a loose, the Gen 2 riding position is slightly kinder and the motor does feel slightly more urgent (comparing road mode on both models).

The new generation S1000R is a striking bike, both fast and agile and more than capable of serving most riders within its capable limits. Itís the perfect antidote to sports bikes without really losing any edge in road performance and focus - as a rider on my search for my next bike, this is an obvious contender.

Great review, I agree about the tail lights, one of riding group has a 2020 XR with the same set up, the tails lights when indicating are confusing and difficult to see. Heís considering adding a small LED tail light above the number plate.

 



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